Restaurant Dining and Mask Use Linked to Virus Spread

In U.S. counties without mask requirements last year, or in which restaurants reopened, infections and death rates rose. …

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Some LGBTQ People Are Saying ‘No Thanks’ to the Covid Vaccine

Evidence suggests that some sexual and gender minorities — especially people of color — are hesitant to get vaccinated due to mistrust of the medical establishment. …

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10 Women Changing the Landscape of Leadership

In critical fields like agriculture, science, finance and technology, they have staked a claim with their pioneering work and are building a path for the next generation. …

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New potential for functional recovery after spinal cord injury

Researchers have successfully reprogrammed a glial cell type in the central nervous system into new neurons to promote recovery after spinal cord injury — revealing an untapped potential to leverage the cell for regenerative medicine. …

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In Oregon, Scientists Find a Virus Variant With a Worrying Mutation

In a single sample, geneticists discovered a version of the coronavirus first identified in Britain with a mutation originally reported in South Africa. …

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Plan to Rebuild Louisiana’s Vanishing Coast Moves Ahead

An environmental assessment said the project’s next step would largely benefit coastal areas, though it might also affect some marine life, especially dolphins. …

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Wisdom, the World’s Oldest Known Wild Bird, Has Another Chick

An albatross named Wisdom has astounded researchers by hatching a chick at more than 70 years old, securing her title as the world’s oldest known breeding bird. …

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Walking pace among cancer survivors may be important for survival

A new study finds a possible link between slow walking pace and an increased risk of death among cancer survivors. The researchers say more work is needed to see if physical activity programs or other interventions could help cancer survivors improve their ability to walk and perhaps increase survival after a cancer diagnosis. …

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How Rhode Island Fell to the Coronavirus

A dense population of vulnerable citizens set the stage for a frightening epidemic. …

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This Shark Is the Ocean’s Biggest Glowing Vertebrate

That we know of. …

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Can Long-Term Care Employers Require Staff Members to Be Vaccinated?

As legal experts and ethicists debate, some companies aren’t waiting. …

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Some Scientists Question W.H.O. Inquiry Into the Coronavirus Pandemic’s Origins

Those who still suspect the outbreak in China may have been caused by a lab leak or accident are pressing for an independent investigation. …

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Popular Drug Does Not Alleviate Mild Covid-19 Symptoms, Study Finds

Ivermectin, a drug typically used to treat parasitic worms, has been prescribed widely during the coronavirus pandemic, but rigorous data has been lacking. …

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One and Done: Why People Are Eager for Johnson & Johnson’s Vaccine

Johnson & Johnson’s one-shot vaccine is allowing states to rethink distribution, even as health officials and experts worry some will view it as inferior. …

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Apparent Atlantic warming cycle likely an artifact of climate forcing

Volcanic eruptions, not natural variability, were the cause of an apparent ‘Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation,’ a purported cycle of warming thought to have occurred on a timescale of 40 to 60 years during the pre-industrial era, according to a team of climate scientists who looked at a large array of climate modeling experiments. …

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Nuclear engineering researchers develop new resilient oxide dispersion strengthened alloy

Researchers have recently shown superior performance of a new oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy they developed for use in both fission and fusion reactors. …

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Less inflammation with a traditional Tanzanian diet than with a Western diet

Urban Tanzanians have a more activated immune system compared to their rural counterparts. The difference in diet appears to explain this difference: in the cities, people eat a more western style diet, while in rural areas a traditional diet is more common. A team of researchers believe that this increased activity of the immune system contributes to the rapid increase in non-communicable diseases in urban areas in Africa. …

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This Creature Is Blind, but Somehow It Knows the Color Blue

Eyeless roundworms may have hacked other forms of cellular warning systems to give themselves a form of color vision. …

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Volcanoes might light up the night sky of this planet

Until now, researchers have found no evidence of global tectonic activity on planets outside our solar system. Scientists have now found that the material inside planet LHS 3844b flows from one hemisphere to the other and could be responsible for numerous volcanic eruptions on one side of the planet. …

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The Moon’s Comet-Like Tail Shoots Beams Around the Earth

“It almost seems like a magical thing,” said one of the astronomers involved in studying the lunar phenomenon. …

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Delayed Skin Reactions Appear After Vaccine Shots

Doctors are reporting additional, minor symptoms that appear several days after people have received their shots. …

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Fauci Is Giving His Coronavirus Model to the Smithsonian

Dr. Anthony S. Fauci’s donation of his 3-D virus model to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History comes as museums are working to document the Covid-19 era. …

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Belly fat resistant to every-other-day fasting

Scientists have mapped out what happens to fat deposits during intermittent fasting (every second day), with an unexpected discovery that some types of fat are more resistant to weight loss. …

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Bahamas were settled earlier than believed

It’s believed early settlers to the islands eventually changed the landscape of the Bahamas. …

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